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Chinese Dimensions
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 Foreword
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CHAPTERS

1. General

2. Naming System

3. Language

4. Origin of Overseas Chinese

5. History

6. Literature

7. Cultural aspects

8. Ancient paradigms

9. Pillars of destiny

10. I-Ching

 Acknowledgement
  Publisher
TOPICS
  Chinese names
  Chinese Nostradamus
  Chinese profile
  Common Chinese surnames
  Congratulatory wordings
  Corrections
  Calendar segments
  Digital Era
  Family relationships
  Fengshui representation
  Fleet to the West
  Fonts
  Hakkas
  Hokkien
  Hong Kong
  Intonation
  Pictogram
  Poetry
  Proverbs
  Salutations
  Simplified Chinese
  Sunzi's Art of War
  Taboo
  Word Structure
  yin-yang
  Zodiac
ARTICLES
TALKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHINESE PICTOGRAMS

WORDS FROM PICTURES

 

Chinese characters originate from pictures, for example:

The character for “water” [shui] is derived from the picture.

                                                            [shui]

                           Picture                                                         Character

Numerous Chinese characters including “river”, “stream”, “flow”, “gush”, “soup”, “tear”, incorporates “water” as a component, known as word radical. This could be written as the character above, or ‘Three doted water’ radical.

 

The Chinese character for “heart” [xin], is depicted as:

                                                                      [xin]

 

Characters pertaining to sentiments or emotions normally have heart as a radical. Characters such as “angry”, “bored”,
“forget”, “loyal”, “toler­ance”, “fear”, “feeling”, “love”, “sad”, “thought”, e
tc. The heart character component [xin] can be written in another form, known as "vertical heart". The Characters having the “heart radical” in this form include “emotion”, “fear”, “hate”, “memory”, “panic”, “respect”, “under­stand” and “worry”.

 

 

The character for “door” [men] is depicted below.

 

                                                         [men]

 

The character is now simplified as . It appears as a component in other characters including “open” [kai], “close” [guan].

 

The word fish [yú] requires little explanation.

 

                                             [yu]      

 

The resemblance to a fish is remarkable. Originally the characters were in all shapes, but they are now presented to fit into “square” format.

 

The challenge comes when one needs to express concepts or abstract ideas such as emotions. Let us look at a few examples.

 

The character [zhong] refers to Middle, Central or Centre. The character depicts a line drawn right in the centre of a rectangle.

                                 [zhong]              (Central, Middle)

When the words Central and Heart are combined we get the scenario whereby the heart remains central, not swayed by circumstances, giving rise to the character Loyalty (zhong).

                                 [zhong]              (Loyal)

More information could be found in Chapter three of the book

For more information please contact the author