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Chinese Dimensions
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 Book Launch
 Book Cover
 Foreword
 Messages
 Introduction
 Content
CHAPTERS
 1. General
 2. Naming System
 3. Language
 4. Origin of Overseas Chinese
 5. History
 6. Literature
 7. Cultural aspects
 8. Ancient paradigms
 9. Pillars of destiny
 10. I-Ching
 Acknowledgement
  Publisher
TOPICS
  Chinese names
  Chinese Nostradamus
  Chinese profile
  Common Chinese surnames
  Congratulatory wordings
  Corrections
  Calendar segments
  Digital Era
  Family relationships
  Fengshui representation
  Fleet to the West
  Fonts
  Hakkas
  Hokkien
  Hong Kong
  Intonation
  Pictogram
  Poetry
  Proverbs
  Salutations
  Simplified Chinese
  Sunzi's Art of War
  Taboo
  Word Structure
  yin-yang
  Zodiac
ARTICLES
TALKS
 

FORMAL SALUTATIONS

It is important to address a person correctly, failing which would result in unnecessary misunderstandings or complications.

 

First of all it is important to identify the Surname and Name, as the Chinese place their surname first, while Westerners put their surname last.

 

A person is officially addressed by his or her surname, with an appropriate title. Common titles include:

Mr.    [xian sheng]           Mrs.  [tai tai]

Ms    [nv shi]                 Miss  [xiao jie]

Once you know the surname of the person you are about to address, mention his or her surname first, followed by the appropriate title. Mr. Chen is addressed as Chen Xiansheng. Confusing the surname with the given name would be a disaster.

Other titles are associated with professions or job designations. Mr. Wang, a teacher, is addressed as Wang laoshi, while Mr. Wang, the Manager is addressed as Wang jingli. As these are official titles it is important to remember the personís status (often shown on the name card). Hierarchy is important in countries such as China and you risk ruffling feathers if a personís due respect is not paid to him.

 

The Chinese people are quite often addressed by their surname, followed by their profession, job title, or status. A list of these terms could be found in chapter seven. Some of them are listed below.

Factory Manager [chang zhang]

Ph. D. [bo shi]

Managing Director [dong shi zhang]

President of a society, association [hui zhang]

Boss, owner of a business [lao ban]

There are also terms titles in China that denotes certain status or hierarchy. They include

Director of a department [chu zhang]

Head of bureau [ju zhang]

Head of section [ke zhang]

Head of district [qu zhang]

Secretary of an organisation [shu ji]

Head of Ministry [ting zhang]

More information could be found in Chapter seven of the book

For more information please contact the author