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     SUNZI'S ART OF WAR

The inscription is taken from Chapter 8 of “The Art of War” 孙子兵法 [Sūnzǐ bīngfǎ], written by Sun Wu. Written 2,500
years ago, the “Art of War” gave a comprehensive analysis of war strategy. It was certainly the first to highlight the 
importance of many aspects of military planning and strategy, including the use of spies. Chapter 8 deals with 
“variation in tactics”.
 
It was presented to the Confucius Institute at the University of Western Australia, by the Shandong Association. 
The translation below was made by Dr. Y. S. Yow

Sun Tzu said: In war, the general receives his commands from his emperor, he gathers his troop.

Do not camp in difficult terrain. Seek allies where roads intersect. Never linger in dangerously isolated positions. Map out your strategy when you are surrounded, Fight for your survival when your situation is desperate.

There are roads that should not be followed, armies which should not be attacked, town that should not be seized, terrains that should not be contested, Imperial commands that should not be obeyed.

The commander who understands the inherent need to modify tactics manages his troops well. The general who fails to appreciate these, even though he could be well versed with local topography, is unable to take advantage of his knowledge.

More information could be found in chapter eight of this book

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