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Chinese Dimensions
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 Book Launch
 Book Cover
 Foreword
 Messages
 Introduction
 Content
CHAPTERS
 1. General
 2. Naming System
 3. Language
 4. Origin of Overseas Chinese
 5. History
 6. Literature
 7. Cultural aspects
 8. Ancient paradigms
 9. Pillars of destiny
 10. I-Ching
 Acknowledgement
  Publisher
TOPICS
  Chinese names
  Chinese Nostradamus
  Chinese profile
  Common Chinese surnames
  Congratulatory wordings
  Corrections
  Calendar segments
  Digital Era
  Family relationships
  Fengshui representation
  Fleet to the West
  Fonts
  Hakkas
  Hokkien
  Hong Kong
  Intonation
  Pictogram
  Poetry
  Proverbs
  Salutations
  Simplified Chinese
  Sunzi's Art of War
  Taboo
  Word Structure
  yin-yang
  Zodiac
ARTICLES
TALKS
 

Chapter 6: Cultural Roots – Chinese Litterature

Chapter Six, “The Chinese mindset, collective wisdom from centuries of publications”, deals with thoughts and ideas behind the Chinese psyche, as reflected in Chinese literature. It begins with a list of 365 proverbs or sayings, one for each day of the week. These proverbs reflect cultural values and judgment criteria. It then looks into Chinese literature, in particular quotations or ancient texts pertaining to education, government, military, philosophy, Confucius studies, as well as some of the best known publications over the centuries. The chapter ends with a brief look at poetry, including [duilian], the “coupled poems”.

 

365 commonly used proverbs are translated into English. They cover a broad spectrum of topics, compiled from various sources, written throughout the centuries. These Proverbs form part of the Chinese psyche, as they are quoted, often assuming that the listener understands.

 

Some of the common quotable quotes written by authors throughout the centuries are listed in themes, such as education, government, military, etc. Many of these quotes are not well known to some of the ethnic Chinese.

 

Part of the Sunzi's art of war is also presented, together with the thirty-six stratagems.

 

Popular novelists, authors and writers from various centuries are highlighted, with a brief description of each of their works. Special mention must be made regarding the “Diagrams of rubbing the back”, a book hardly known in the West, as well as amongst many ethnic Chinese.

 

The chapter ends with a look at Chinese poetry. Due to the imperial examination system for recruitment of civil service, many statesmen are themselves poets. Six poems are translated, while fifty of the popular ones listed.

 

Coupled poems, unique to Chinese literature, is presented, together with examples.

 

Other topics covered in this website include,  Chinese Nostradamus, Words of congratulations.

For more information please contact the author